Huntington County Indiana Memoirs about A. C. Huffman

 

From the Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County 1901 pages 718-720


 

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A C Huffman 1910

        Abram C Huffman in 1909

 

Huntington County Indiana Memoirs about Abram C. Huffman

 

    From the Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County 1901 pages 718-720

 

Abram C. Huffman, a native of Jackson township, Huntington county, Indiana, was born near where he now lives on the 4th day of March, 1846.

 

His father, William Huffman, a native of Richland county, Ohio, and his mother, Elizabeth (Smith) Huffman, also from that state, moved to Huntington county in the year 1845, making the journey from their Ohio home to the place of their future residence in what is now the township of Jackson by canal as far as Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and the balance of the journey was made by ox team, consuming many days before reaching their destination.

 

William Huffman bought one hundred and sixty acres of land lying in section four, for which he paid the sum of one thousand dollars, and after building a rude log cabin sufficiently large to accommodate his family, he proceeded with the greater task of clearing the place of the dense forest which then covered it. In the course of years his work was crowned with success, a good farm, supplied with many conveniences being the reward of his arduous toil and severe hardships.

 

He lived a useful life, helped lay out roads, organized schools and finally, his labors ended, he passed peacefully to that bourne from which no traveler returns, September 24, 1871, the forty-seventh anniversary birthday. He was a pious member of the Methodist church, assisted in the building of the old house of worship known as Wesley Chapel, located near his place of residence, and by his wholesome influence induced many of the early settlers to change their course of conduct from evil to good.

 

Later he helped to erect the new frame church, near the site of the old one. His widow survived him until July 28, 1894, when she departed this life at the age of seventy-five.

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William and Elizabeth Huffman had a family of five children, the subject of this sketch being the oldest of the number; the others were Maggie, wife of Leander Smith; John, who died in infancy; William, a resident of St. Joseph, Missouri; and an infant daughter, the twin of Maggie, that died in infancy.

 

Abram C. Huffman was reared to manhood on the home farm and received a practical education in the common schools and the Roanoke Seminary. Progress in his studies was very satisfactory, and at the age of twenty-one he began teaching, a vocation he followed during the winter for two years. While in his minority he remained under the parental roof, assisting with the work of the farm, and was thus engaged when the sound of hostile cannon summoned him to take up arms in defense of the National Union.

 

In May, 1864, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served one hundred days, principally in the cities of Nashville and Tullahoma, Tennessee.

 

After receiving his discharge he returned home, but did not long remain, enlisting again in January, 1865, in Company B, One Hundred and Fifty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which he accompanied to Clarksville, Tennessee, thence to Hopkinsville, Kentucky, his principal duty being to guard against guerrillas and to rid southern Kentucky of irregular forces of the enemy.

Huffman Roanoke Veterans

      Abram C. Huffman in about 1900 with other Civil War veterans from Huntington County: (l to r) Hiram Wells (1839-1920), Frank Cedars (1848-1923), Peter Smith (1842-1914), Abram Huffman with red arrow, Benson Smith (1846-1926), Henry Dinius (1833-1914), Noah Burdoine (1841-1932), Dr. Sylvanus Koontz (1844-1925), Simon Peigh (1845-1932), Jake Johns (1843-1919), George Gundy (1835-1925), James Plummer (1841-1909), William Arnold (1845-1909), Hiram Dustman (1845-1925)

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On September 4, 1865, Mr. Huffman received his second discharge and returned to Huntington county, immediately thereafter engaging in the pursuit of agriculture, a vocation to which he has ever since devoted his time and energies.

 

On October 21, 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Aurora B. Comstock, who was born on the same farm on which she now resides, February 19, 1850, and is a daughter of Charles and Polly Comstock, of Pennsylvania.

 

Mrs. Huffman's parents were married in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania. About 1838 he came to Huntington county, Indiana, and engaged in contracting in the building of locks, etc., on the canal. About 1840 he purchased several hundred acres of government land in the township of Jackson, a part of which is included in the farm where the subject of this sketch now resides.

 

By occupation Mr. Comstock was a carpenter and contractor, and he did much work in that line on public works in Huntington county and at Ft. Wayne, as well as on the canal, the first few years following his arrival, and also engaged in building boats for the canal.

 

He preceded his family to the new home by three years, during which time he erected a dwelling and otherwise prepared a home for the reception of his wife and children, who followed him at the expiration of that period in a large wagon laboriously drawn by an ox team.

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Mrs. Huffman is one of five children: The oldest, Waty, deceased, became the wife of Samuel T. Morgan, of Huntington; Rosalia died in childhood; Andrew F., deceased; Charles E. is a farmer living in Michigan; and Aurora B. was the youngest member of the family.

 

To Mr. and Mrs. Huffman have been born five children, whose names are as follows: Lillian E., wife of Monroe Dinius, of Jackson township; Archer W. lives in California; Mable E. married John Ellsworth and resides in Allen county, Indiana; Walter C., a graduate of the Huntington Business College, has a good clerical position in the city of Detroit, Michigan; and Verne A. still lives at the old home.

Seth Hadley 1948

        Walter C. Huffman Senior, son of Abram C Huffman

 

Mr. Huffman moved to the farm where he at present lives in October, 1868. He has always followed farming as a livelihood, and is now one of the successful and well-to-do farmers and stock-raisers of Jackson, owning one hundred and forty-six acres of finely cultivated land, upon which may be seen some of the best improvements in the township.

Huffman Jackson Township

      Three properties of Abram C. Huffman in 1879

 

In addition to general farming and stock-raising he devotes considerable attention to fruit growing, especially apples, pears, plums and cherries, in which his success has been such as to induce others to imitate his example.

 

He has done much to introduce fine grades of fruit into the country, and believes that when properly cared for and well looked after the orchard can be made one of the most profitable, and certainly the most pleasant part, of the farmer's work.

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As a man and citizen no man stands higher in public esteem or merits greater consideration for what he has done than Mr. Huffman. Industry, energy and integrity are among his chief characteristics, and during a life-time spent in one township his career has been such as to command the highest respect of all who have known or met him in a business or social way.

 

He is an intelligent gentleman, well informed on all leading questions of the day, and has always been a friend of schools and an advocate of the general dissemination of knowledge among the people.

 

In politics he is a Republican with the courage of his convictions, and in religion subscribes to the Methodist creed. Mrs. Huffman is also a member of the Methodist church, being an active worker in her congregation and alive to all of its interests and philanthropic movements.

 

Aurora Comstock Huffman's father: Charles Comstock from "Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County

 

The same Huntington County Archives has the following further information on Aurora Comstock Huffman's father, Charles Comstock from "Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County, 1901", pages 434-437:

 

"...Charles Comstock, grandfather of Bert Aaron Comstock, was a native of Buttermilk Falls, Pennsylvania. His ancestors were among the early settlers in the colony established by Roger Williams in 1632, at what was then known as the Plantation of New Providence, now Rhode Island. They were Irish emigrants, and arrived there in 1683. From the records of the family it is shown that for two generations they had lived and prospered in Pennsylvania, and in 1832 Charles Comstock moved to Indiana. He was a master carpenter, and took large contracts for the construction of canal locks, culverts, stone piers, etc., and much of his work is still in evidence on the canal between Fort Wayne and Lafayette. He also became interested in a general store, and his books contained entries that would cause a smile to an accountant of the present day. For instance: John Smythe, July 29, to one gallon whisky, two pounds lard, one pound tobacco, half pound salt; July 30, one white dog, one gallon whisky, five pounds flour. The currency of the period was not of a substantial character, and the storekeeper would seldom accept what was called wildcat money for more than half of its face value. It was frequently the case with those who handled the paper money of those days that on closing business for one day, the next day's news from the business centers would show a very large proportion of it to be almost, if not wholly, worthless..."

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Click here to go the the Huffman Family Tree

 

Click here to go to the The Boyer - Kramer Family Records

 

Click here to go to the Norwood Family Records

 

Navigation of huffman.tk:

Click on the link below

Return to Huffman Family home page

Huffman Family family history

Hadley Family family history

Lagakos Family family history

Waller Family family history

Whicker Family family history

Eckenrode-Pierson Family family history

The Boyer - Kramer Family Records

Norwood Family Records

Huffman Family Photographs

click on the link below:

Huffman Photographs 1
Huffman Photographs 2

Hadley Family Photographs

click on the link below:

Hadley Photographs 1
Hadley Photographs 2

Junkin Family Photographs

click on the link below:

Junkin Photographs 1
Junkin Photographs 2

Lagakos Family Photographs

click on the link below:

Lagakos Photographs 1
Lagakos Photographs 2

Whicker Family Photographs

click on the link below:

Whicker Photographs 1
Whicker Photographs 2

Eckenrode-Pierson Family Photographs

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1 from Biographical Memoirs of Huntington County 1901 pages 718-720

If you have any comments or questions about this site, please e-mail me (Larry Huffman) at e-mail address: leopold.stokowski@gmail.com