Tillman Hadley Biographical Article

 

From History of Hendricks County (1885) published by Chicago: Interstate Publishing, 1885


 

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Tillman Hannah Hadley

            Tillman and Hannah Hadley circa 1875

 

Tillman Hadley from History of Hendricks County (1885) page 680:

 

Tillman Hadley, son of William T. and Beulah Hadley, was born April 13, 1839, on the old homestead in this township, where his grandfather settled in 1829. He was reared a farmer and has always followed that avocation. He remained at home till 1861 when he went to Clarke County, Iowa. At the end of a year he returned home, and Feb. 28, 1863, he was married to Susannah Jane Coffin , came to this county when a young man and was here married. Her parents are deceased.

 

Two children were born to this union - Melworth K., who died at the age of sixteen years, and Julia Vashti, now a resident of Texas. Mrs. Hadley died Nov. 19, 1866, aged twenty-three years. Mr. Hadley married again Sept. 8, 1869, to Hannah Hadley, a native of Clay Township, this county, and daughter of Nathan and Olive Hadley, of Clay Township. To them were born six children, all of whom are living - Luther, Olive, Beulah, Smithie [note: correct spelling Smythy], William and Paul. [note: this biographical article was written in 1885 prior to the seventh child, Seth Hadley's birth in 1887] Mr. Hadley resides on section 13, where he has a farm of 400 acres of excellent land, 100 acres of which is in Clay Township. He also owns the White corner property and a dwelling house on West Marion street, in Danville, and three and a half sections of land in Crosby County, Texas. He is a member of the society of Friends. Politically he is a Republican.

 

Hannah Hadley from A Portrait and Biographical Record of Hendricks County

(Chicago: A.W. Bowen & Co. 1895 pages 919-921)

 

Hannah Hadley, of Hendricks County, Ind. - Joshua Hadley, the grandfather of Hannah Hadley, was born the thirteenth of the twelfth month, 1783, in Chatham County, N.C. He was the son of Joshua and Ruth (Lindley) Hadley, and married Rebecca Hinshaw of that county. To them were born Mary, Zeno, Nathan, Job, Susannah, Asenath, Ruth, Mordecai, Addison and Esther, all born in Chatham County, N.C. Mr. Hadley, like his father, was a member of the Friends' Church, and in 1837 moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in Liberty township, two miles north of Clayton. He was reluctant to leave his old home, but was finally induced to do so by his wife and his son Nathan. He prospered after coming to this county, and finally owned a large tract of land. He died in 1843, beloved by all who knew him. Nathan Hadley, son of above was the father of Hannah Hadley, and was born January 19, 1813, in Chatham County, N.C., on his father's farm. He received a good education, and like nearly all his brothers and sisters, taught school for a while. He came to Hendricks County, Ind., in company with his brother Zeno, in 1832, making the journey with a one-horse wagon, and on the way sold North Carolina whetstones, and in this way paid expenses. They both worked at farm work for awhile and then each of them bought land.

 

Nathan Hadley returned to North Carolina in about two years and married Olive Newlin, by which marriage there were born three children: Lida, Hannah and David. In 1837 he returned to Indiana and brought his family, consisting of his wife and one child, and settled on 160 acres of land in the woods, clearing this up by hard labor. He was a very strong man, weighing 250 pounds in his prime, and reaching 300 pounds in later life. By thrift and good management he became the possessor of 500 acres of land. He was an active man in county and political affairs, and was a strong advocate of the anti-slavery cause. He was a wide reader for his day, and well versed in history, especially so in anything pertaining to the anti-slavery cause, voted the know-nothing and free soil tickets, and was one of the original republicans of this county. He was a man of strong mental concentration, and fixed his mind so firmly on matters interesting him as to forget all else. On one occasion, when about forty years of age, he went to mill horseback, and, being greatly interested in the free soil question then agitating the people, he left his horse tied to a post, his grist in the mill, and walked home completely absorbed in his subject. On reaching home he was asked why he was walking, and not until then recovered his presence of mind. At another time he had attended church with his wife and drove away, after the service, without her. His neglect flashing upon his mind, he drove rapidly back, and, on meeting his son David, was asked why he was driving so fast. He exclaimed, "Why, I have forgotten Emily." Mr. Hadley lived in strict conformity to the doctrines of the Friends' Church, but was liberal in his views, and was one of those Friends who joined the progressive element. He gave all his children good educations for the day. His first wife died in 1843, and he married Mary A. Harvey, of Ohio, the daughter of John and Mahala (Plummer) Harvey. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley became the parents of four children: Eunice Clark, and Rebecca, who died at the age of twenty years, and two that died in infancy. Mrs. Hadley lived about ten years after marriage, and died. Mr. Hadley then married Emily Brown, of this county. She lived until 1882, when she also died, and he married, in his old age, Mary Newlin, of North Carolina, a half-sister of his first wife, who still survives him. Mr. Hadley was a man of more than ordinary ability and possessed a very intelligent mind and great force of character. He died April 10, 1892, aged seventy-eight years, in the town of Hadley, which he had laid out on his farm in 1870.

 

David Hadley, son of the above, and the brother of Hannah, was born October 2, 1842, on his father's farm in Hendricks County, attended the Friends' Academy at Mooresville, Ind., and taught school one year in Clay Township. In 1863 he was appointed superintendent of the freedmen's school at Gallatin, Tenn., in which he was, at that time, a teacher, he and his sisters, Hannah and Elida, having gone south for the purpose of assisting in the education of the colored people in the employ of the Freedmen's Aid Society. At that time attempts to educate the negro were very unpopular, and were only possible in the south when the military held control. On the withdrawal of the army the teachers were advised to leave, and were exposed to many indignities and some danger. They persevered against many difficulties, and taught at least one thousand negros to read and write and gave them the rudiments of an education. The average attendance was at least five hundred. The school was held in buildings confiscated by the government, and at different time a barn, a church, and a hotel were utilized for this purpose. After the school at Gallatin was closed David Hadley was principal of a school on the plantation of the rebel Gen. Donaldson, under the protection of a United State colored military company. The colored people showed great eagerness to learn, and appreciated the efforts in their behalf, all ages, classes, conditions and colors coming to school. They had to be clothed to render them fit to attend, and the clothing and books were furnished by the Freedmen's Aid Society of Cincinnati, and thus the helpless negro slave was helped on his way to become an American citizen. Transportation, rations, and building for schoolhouses were furnished by order of Gen. Grant. These young teachers had left a comfortable home and comparative wealth to teach these ignorant people, who had hardly a knowledge of the common decencies of life. After his return home, David engaged in farming on the old homestead, and married April 28, 1868, Sarah M., daughter of Joel H. and Ruth (Morris) Morris, and to this union were born five children: Josephine M., Morris J., Mary N., Ruth E., and Geraldine B.

 

Mr. Hadley is a prosperous farmer and a minister in the Friends' Church. Hannah Hadley, the daughter of Nathan and Olive (Newlin) Hadley, is the widow of Tillman Hadley, who was born April 13, 1839, received a good common education and became a farmer. Like his forefathers, he was a member of the Friends' Church. He married, for his first wife, Susan J., daughter of Charles Coffin, and they had two children: Melmoth K., deceased at sixteen years of age, and Julia B. Mr. Hadley inherited eighty acres of land from his father, which is a part of the farm now occupied by our subject, and on which he settled about 1858. He was a thrifty man and soon accumulated 160 acres. His wife died five years after marriage, and he married, September 8, 1869, Hannah Hadley, our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley became the parents of seven children: Luther; Olive, died aged twenty-one years, nine months; Beulah; Smith; William; Paul and Seth T. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley settled on the homestead after marriage, Mrs. Hadley inheriting seventy-three acres of land and $2,500 in cash from her father. By good management, patient labor and their combined efforts, they added to this land until they owned 500 acres. Mr. Hadley died, aged forty-eight years and nine months, on the sixteenth day, first month, 1888. He was a man of devout religious convictions and was looked up to in his church as a prominent member, and was much respected. He was of few words, slow to speak his mind, but of sound and mature judgment. He was originally a Republican, but later a prohibitionist.

 

Hannah Hadley was born in Clay Township, fourth day, second month, 1841, received an excellent education and taught one term of school in the township. Her mind had been instilled from her earliest youth, by her father, with a love of liberty and an abhorrence of slavery, and with a desire to assist and uplift the down-trodden slave. In 1862, in company with Job Hadley and his wife, Tacy, she went to Cairo, Ill., and taught the contraband refugees from the south, and received no pay for this arduous service except the regular government rations of a soldier. They taught three months, when a wider field opened in the south, and she went, accompanied by her sister Elida and her brother David, to Gallatin, Tenn., and taught the colored people in this vicinity for about three years. Mrs. Hadley lost her health in the south, as she had to endure many privations, and it was some years before she recovered. She is a devout member of the Friends' Church, and her record shows plainly that she is capable of great self-sacrifice; she is, beside, a woman of excellent business capacity. When her husband died, her eldest son was but sixteen years of age, and she had the entire management of the farm for years. By her sagacity she has added to it until the homestead now consists of 500 acres, and she acquired, in Idaho, 360 acres beside.

 

Daniel Hunt (father of Beulah Hunt Hadley): from History of Hendricks County (1895) page 685:

 

Daniel Hunt, of Marion Township, Hendricks County, Ind., is one of the oldest settlers and a pioneer, and springs from sterling English stock. Eleazar Hunt, grandfather of our subject, was a farmer of Guilford County, N.C., and a member of the Friends' Church. He married and reared a family of eight children, Asaul, Asher, Hiram, John, Stephen, Zimri, Zedick Ithamer and Beula. Mr. Hunt lived to be an old man and died in North Carolina, a respected citizen of devout religious character. Zimri Hunt, father of our subject, was born in Guilford County, N.C., received the common education of his day, and married Rebecca, daughter of Williamson and Rebecca Brown, and to Mr. and Mrs. Hunt were born eleven children, beula, Stephen, Mary, Asenath, Ithamer, Daniel, Annie, Lydia, Jeanette, Rebecca and Zimri. The first six were born in North Carolina and the remaining five were born in Marion Township, Hendricks County. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hunt were members of the Friends' Church. In 1827, Mr. Hunt came to Hendricks County, Ind., bringing his family, making the journey of about 700 miles in six weeks and arriving in November, sixty-seven years ago. The country was a wilderness, and they came with one four-horse and one two-horse team. He entered and settled upon eighty acres near where Henry Hunt now lives. He cleared up forty acres, when it was discovered ten years later that a mistake had been made in the number of his section, and he lost this land, receiving but $50 for his improvements. He then entered the next eighty acres east, at that time in the green woods, and began life over. He cleared this and lived on it for about twenty-five years, then bought land at what is known now as Billtown, and afterward moved to the 100 acres where his son Zimri now lives, and here he died at about seventy-five years of age. He had always been a hard-working, pioneer citizen, strictly honest and straightforward, and was respected by all who knew him.

 

Daniel Hunt, our subject, was born December 25, 1825, in Guilford County, N.C., and was not quite two years of age when he was brought by his parents to Hendricks County, Ind. He received the usual pioneer education in the old log school-house in the woods three miles from his father's home, finding his way by a blazed trail, going to school through the winter months for probably not over one year in all. He early began to work at burning brush, and as soon as large enough to handle an ax, he assisted to clear the land. The custom was to burn all this valuable timber, as no use could be made of it. The country was full of game, deer and wild turkey, and the settlers used a great deal of it. Mr. Hunt worked for his father until he was twenty years old, and then began life for himself, with nothing but a stout heart and frame. He began at farm work at $9 per month, which was increased one dollar per month for five years. He split rails at twenty-five and thirty cents per hundred, and made $1 per day, and scoring timber made the same price. At the age of twenty-five years, having worked by himself five years, he saved $550. Part of this he earned in saw-mills on extra time, by working one-half of the night, and thus made nine days per week. At the age of twenty-five years he bought 100 acres of land in the green woods, one mile north of his present farm, cleared this land with no help, and lived on it three years, having built a nice hewed log house.

 

In 1854 Mr. Hunt married Ellen, daughter of Charles and Susan (Hedden) Hunter. Mr. Hunter was from Kentucky, and settled in Putnam County as one of the pioneers in Floyd Township. He was the father of nine children, Eliza, Mary, Harriet, John, Catherine, Lucinda, Ellen, Isaac and Elizabeth. Mr. Hunter lived to be seventy-three years of age and died on his farm. He was a Regular Baptist minister and well known by all the old settlers in Putnam and Hendricks Counties as the pioneer preacher for many years. After marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hunt settled in their log house and lived there for eighteen years, and here all their children were bornóBedial J., Charles Z., and Lydia E. Mr. Hunt cleared up his farm and by thrift and patient industry, assisted by his faithful wife, added to his land until he owned 605 acres, a handsome property. Much of this property he has given to his children, and he has retained 365 acres for the homestead. Mr. Hunt came to his present farm in 1872 and built his present residence in 1876. He has always been strong and able, does as much as any man, and now, at the age of sixty-nine years, can do a good hard day's labor. Mr. and Mrs. Hunt are members of the Regular Baptist Church and he has been deacon five years, has always assisted his church liberally and has assisted every church within four miles of him when called upon. He gave all his children a good education, has been public-spirited, and assisted in having good roads and good schools. Politically he is a Republican. Mr. Hunt has made all he has with his own hands and by good management, assisted by his faithful wife, who has also done a vast amount of hard work and been a true helpmate and faithful mother.

 

Charles Z. Hunt, son of Daniel, married Anna Whicker, and has had five children born to his marriage. He is a farmer. Bedial J. married F.P. Wright, a farmer of Floyd Township, and has three children; Lydia E., the daughter, married Wm. Kelly, a farmer of Clay Township, and has two children. The children are well settled in life, all received a share of the home property, and remained among the respected families in Hendricks County.

 

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